SHANGHAI-LEKSIKON
Guomindang

The Guomindang was Chinese foremost nationalist party, it's name literally meaning The Nationalist Party, which formed the government from 1928-1949 and from then on Taiwan from 1949 until the 1980s. It remains one of the largest parties on Taiwan and is currently the governing party.

The Guomindang was founded by Sun Yatsen in 1911 as a unification of the disparate nationalist and republican rebellions against the Qing Dynasty. Despite achieving its goal of toppling the Qing Dynasty, the Guomindang wasn't very successful early on and was already suppressed following a failed rebellion against the new government in 1913.

A new nationalist awakening and Soviet support gave the party a resurgence starting in the early 1920s. This allowed the party to build its own state with a capital in Guangzhou (Canton), including an army under the leadership of Chiang Kaishek. The purpose of this army was to end the fragmentation that had followed the fall of the Qing Dynasty and establish a national, democratic government. The party suffered from internal divisions, however, due to trying to represent all of Chinese nationalism, from a Communist left wing to an authoritarian right wing based in the military. Before his death in 1925, Sun Yatsen's personal dominance of Guomindang policy kept this in check, keeping official policy close to that of the Communists.

The Guomindang put its army to use for the unification of China with the Northern Expedition in 1926. By 1928, the Northern Expedition had put all but the westernmost regions under the control of the Guomindang. However, it was no longer the same Guomindang. In 1927 Chiang Kaishek carried out a military coup against the Guomindang's civilian leadership and had purged it of both Communists and the left in general. This also meant that ideals of democracy had taken a backseat to the military and conservative cultural values.

During the 1930s, the Guomindang under the leadership of Chiang Kaishek maintained control over the majority of China and became the formal leader of the Chinese resistance to the Japanese invasion after 1937. Following the end of the second world war, the Guomindang lost the civil war to the Communists and was driven in exile on Taiwan.


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What does the Guomindang want?
As the war in China heats up and Shanghai itself is under siege by Guomindang soldiers, one question naturally rises in the mind of anybody with an interest in China: What does the Guomindang, the southern party that seemingly rose from the aether in Canton to raise a mighty army against the north, want?

If you were to listen to the claims of the Guomindang itself, it wants to form a national government for all of China, end the fighting between the warlords and restore international respect for China. In other words, exactly the same as any of the feuding warlords claims his goal is. Unlike the warlords, however, the Guomindang doesn't recognize the privileges of the white man in Shanghai or the aid he provides in modernizing China. The party demands that privileges and concessions get abolished and returned to the control of the Chinese government.

But believing the word of the Guomindang would be a grave error. Even if Communist agitators working for the Guomindang wasn't visible to everyone right here in Shanghai, reliable sources have confirmed that the Guomindang receives support from the bolshevik regime in Russia. In other words, the reality is that the Guomindang is simply another Communist party seeking to use the turmoil in China to spread the revolution with promises of national salvation.





Søren Hein Rasmussen
Christina Maria Jessen

Ying Chen
Sissel Vennike Ditlevsen
Christina Maria Jessen
Carsten Lysbjerg Mogensen
Søren Hein Rasmussen
Rikke Holst Thomsen

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